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Educational Resources

Intelino Lab

Ages:

Kindergarten to Lower Primary
Lower to Upper Secondary

Classroom lessons available

Intelino Lab is a great place offering a variety of resources for all ages. For young children of ages 3 and above check out their Count By Numbers colour-and-match Activity series, or engage them with Colour Quest series for more of a challenge. For teachers looking to let your kindergarten students dip their toes in coding, the K-1 Snap Training is an excellent, fully-prepped introductory course to the capabilities of the Intelino Smart Train while imparting basic STEM concepts.

For older kids, the Science Series lessons showcase interesting ways to use the Intelino Smart Train (along with a separate third-party product, the PocketLab Voyager) to demonstrate physical science concepts that are learnt in Upper Primary and Secondary levels. For more coding projects with the Smart Train, check out the programs written in Scratch and find inspiration for problem-solving scenarios that you can pose to spur their critical thinking and application of their coding skills.

Sphero Edu

Ages:

Kindergarten to Lower Primary
Upper Primary to Lower Secondary
Upper Secondary and above

Classroom lessons available

Sphero Edu is the repository for Sphero bots-based activities and lessons. Activities are classified by the most relevant subjects, age groups and the Sphero bots that they can work with. The main peripheral here is the Sphero Edu app – download it, make an account, login, and you are good to go! With a Parent account, you can get an overview of your child’s account and their activities, while the Educator account provides the extended functionality of planning lessons around the available activities, assigning and tracking progress of a group of students.

Beyond the structured lessons, you can also take a look at the example programs shared both by Sphero and the community as well. Use the example code to set problem-solving situations for kids, or just have fun running the various remixes done by others!

LittleBits Classroom

Ages:

Kindergarten to Lower Primary
Upper Primary to Lower Secondary
Upper Secondary and above

Classroom lessons available

LittleBits was made with the intention of making circuits easy and fun even for kids. To that end, there definitely is an excellent collection of resources to guide children along this journey. From lessons that impart specific skills, to projects that will allow kids to let their imagination run free, there is no shortage of ideas here. The lessons from LittleBits are detailed and easy to follow, while community submissions add to the variety of ideas available on the website.

For educators, there are classroom-focused kits and directions available. In addition, the LittleBits Classroom portal offers lesson units they call Curriculum – these ordered lessons provide systematic progression and are scaled to be held across multiple sessions, making lesson planning easier than ever. Experienced teachers also share their secrets for classroom management, troubleshooting and more under Educator Tips.

Ozobot Classroom

Ages:

Kindergarten to Lower Primary
Upper Primary to Lower Secondary
Upper Secondary and above

Classroom lessons available

The Ozobot Classroom's Lesson Library contains a plethora of lessons for all ages, and for a variety of topics as well. Going beyond just computer science, the lessons cover a variety of topics like art and music, or math and science. The lessons are a mixture of Ozobot's own offerings and verified lesson idea submissions from other teachers. With easy pairing to the robots in a classroom, teachers can easily disseminate lessons and monitor every robot's status. Saving lessons as you come across them also helps teachers easily plan for future lessons.

The Ozobot Classroom software is mostly free and easily accessible for teachers, but for full-feature access and effective use in the classroom it requires the purchase of the Classroom Communicator hardware. (For Classroom Kits purchased prior to January 2020, you may request a free license code and Communicator here.) It is centred around teacher-student use, and the lessons are compilation of lesson material and instructions on how to conduct the lesson. This will prove useful for a formal education setting.

For more home-based projects, you can head to Ozobot’s blog for more ideas, or for introducing and teaching coding, take a look at Ozoblockly.

MakeWonder Curriculum

Ages:

Kindergarten to Lower Primary
Upper Primary to Lower Secondary

Classroom lessons available

MakeWonder's curriculum portal offers fully planned curriculum and assessment ideas for students from pre-primary school (K) up to Secondary 2 (Grade 8). Divided into Learn to Code (Kindergarten to P5) and Applied Robotics (P6 to Sec 2), programming and robotics concepts are divided into different levels and recommended age groups. At each level, the curated lesson material provide a structured way to teach coding, impart STEM skills and to assess their understanding. If you have purchased a subscription, you can also use the Class Connect feature to easily manage and schedule lessons and activity times with your class.

Beyond programming and robotics, there is a community-sourced Cross-Curricular Lesson Library where teachers can upload lesson plans where Dash or Cue were used to demonstrate or teach concepts in other subjects. In addition, there are various educational game apps available on mobile platforms that work with the robots. Parents looking to meaningfully entertain their children can look for these apps on the App Store or Google Play Store.

Chibitronics

Ages:

Upper Primary to Lower Secondary
Upper Secondary and above

Chibitronics’ gallery houses a moderate collection of projects that incorporate their products into a variety of projects, mostly submitted by users. Ranging from a small collection of detailed lesson plans and tutorials, to posts by the community displaying a cool project they brought to life, the list of projects will surely serve to inspire everyone to get making start innovating.

You can also take a look at the Educators' section to find more Art or Science projects, and a list of circuit templates with simple instructions and explanations on their use. Most projects are easy enough to follow along as-is, but the material may not always be classroom-optimised (outline learning objectives, discussion points, etc.). Yet, it will still provide a firm footing for introducing circuits and basic science concepts into your lesson.

CircuitScribe

Ages:

Upper Primary to Lower Secondary
Upper Secondary and above

CircuitScribe has a fairly extensive collection of lessons and projects hosted on Workbench Education – the project listings range from simple circuit examples that demonstrate concepts like logic circuits, to more interesting application examples like making a potentiometer or creating circuits for a smart home. Lessons are well-documented and easy to follow along, making for easy conveyance of learnings about electrical circuitry and components.

CircuitScribe’s Projects page contains more listings the various tutorial videos they have hosted on YouTube, along with a Drone Curriculum project for kids to learn about the physics and circuitry behind drone flight. Do note that many links to the project ideas are broken, but they can be found on Workbench.

Strawbees Learning

Ages:

Kindergarten to Lower Primary
Upper Primary to Lower Secondary

Classroom lessons available

Strawbees’ learning platform has a modest collection of activities, lesson plans and explorations. The activities are smaller base projects with simple video instructions and tips for classroom engagement, while lesson plans and explorations are teacher-focused facilitation guides, with clear exposition of objectives and relevant themes in the lessons. Explorations also often include assessment metrics and make students use skills beyond craft/programming (such as communication and presentation skills). The activities are great for entertaining children, and the plentiful resources like blueprints and presentation slides make it easy for teachers and all educators to incorporate these activities in their sessions. Similarly, the Strawbees coding platform has a handful of tutorials and coding cards to acclimatise users with the basic functions.

While the quality of the activities and lessons are excellent, the quantity is limited. However, with a few projects to spark some ideas and get them familiar with Strawbees’ potential, students should be well-equipped to utilise the construction tool to the fullest.

Primo Toys' Cubetto

Ages:

Kindergarten to Lower Primary
Upper Primary

Primo Toys’ Cubetto sets come with Story Books that already outline the basics and some activities for kids, but if you’re looking for something more, Primo Toys has a Playroom tab dedicated to projects and activities with the Cubetto. Cubetto Crafts are simple craft projects to dress up Cubetto or make accompanying props. Cubetto Mazes describe a hypothetical scenario for Cubetto, and gets kids to outline an appropriate path for Cubetto on the World Map. Family Games are fun and simple activities the family can do together (although a number of them require extensions like the Play Cards or Code & Colour). All projects and activities are well documented with accompanying instructions and step-by-step pictures.

For lesson plans and more educator-focused resources, Primo Toys requires you to register with them to get their available lesson plan resources. [what about them]

Makedo HUB

Ages:

Kindergarten to Lower Primary
Upper Primary to Lower Secondary
Upper Secondary

Makedo has a dedicated portal for all their projects and lesson plans – Makedo HUB houses both community submissions displaying their creative end products, as well as Makedo’s own making projects. While the community features do not have steps for reproducing them, Makedo’s listings have simple, printable instructional graphics that explain how to make projects like a car or their mascot, the Makedog.

For educators, there are no direct classroom plans, but some posts do provide ideas for applications or display some of the larger scale projects that were implemented in the classroom. In addition, there are a couple of children’s book reviews of reading material that might inspire children to let their creativity roam free.